Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 15-

Brother Mujeeb's technique to fix the hair away from the surgical site


Jay Prakash1, Natesh S Rao1, J Prashanth Prabhu1, Shagun Sareen2,  
1 Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of ENT, Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jay Prakash
205, Roma Pearl Apartment, AECS Layout A Block, Kundalahalli, Bengaluru - 560 037, Karnataka
India




How to cite this article:
Prakash J, Rao NS, Prabhu J P, Sareen S. Brother Mujeeb's technique to fix the hair away from the surgical site.Ann Indian Acad Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2018;2:15-15


How to cite this URL:
Prakash J, Rao NS, Prabhu J P, Sareen S. Brother Mujeeb's technique to fix the hair away from the surgical site. Ann Indian Acad Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Surg [serial online] 2018 [cited 2020 Jul 9 ];2:15-15
Available from: http://www.aiaohns.in/text.asp?2018/2/1/15/246143


Full Text



Sir,

There are various techniques to fix the hair away from the surgical site to maintain sterility to tissues exposed during surgical procedures. We want to narrate an interesting event and add one more technique to the list.

A 24-year-old female patient was posted for the superficial parotidectomy; one of the residents was fixing the hair by Micropore, but after draping, it was not fixed and few hairs were in the draped area. Brother Mujeeb, our senior anesthesia technician, intervened and suggested that better to fix the hair by applying lignocaine jelly and rub it. He said as it is sterilized and on draping, hair will fix easier as it is thick. We are using this technique, and we have not found such a technique yet published in literature search.

As we know, the most common source of pathogens that cause surgical site infections is the patient. While microorganisms normally colonize parts in or on the human body without causing disease, infection may result when this endogenous flora is introduced to tissues exposed during surgical procedures. To reduce this risk, the patient is prepared or prepped by shaving hair from the surgical site; cleansing with a disinfectant containing chemicals such as iodine, alcohol, or chlorhexidine gluconate; and applying sterile drapes around the surgical site.[1]

Hair has often been perceived to be associated with a lack of cleanliness, and its removal linked to infection prophylaxis.[2] Shaving, clipping, and depilatory creams are various modalities of hair removal. Shaving results in microscopic cuts and abrasions, thus acting as a disruption of the skin's barrier, defense against microorganism colonization. Previous studies have shown that shaving the skin as compared with clipping results in a statistically significant increase in the rate of surgical site infection.[3],[4] Randomized controlled trials have examined the practice of preoperative hair removal and its relation to operative site infection.[5]

We propose this technique as another addition to the existing list of techniques. We further propose this technique to be known as Brother Mujeeb's technique in honor of our technician.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Reichman DE, Greenberg JA. Reducing surgical site infections: A review. Rev Obstet Gynecol 2009;2:212-21.
2Kumar K, Thomas J, Chan C. Cosmesis in neurosurgery: Is the bald head necessary to avoid postoperative infection? Ann Acad Med Singapore 2002;31:150-4.
3Alexander JW, Fischer JE, Boyajian M, Palmquist J, Morris MJ. The influence of hair-removal methods on wound infections. Arch Surg 1983;118:347-52.
4Balthazar ER, Colt JD, Nichols RL. Preoperative hair removal: A random prospective study of shaving versus clipping. South Med J 1982;75:799-801.
5Tanner J, Woodings D, Moncaster K. Preoperative hair removal to reduce surgical site infection. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2006;19:CD004122.